"Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s
peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.
The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms
their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves."

— John Muir

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FIELD NOTES: EDUCATING FOR THE WILD

Hike on Round Mountain
By Dave Gibson

 


Anorthosite as a book


Balsam loaded with old and new cones


Looking down the valley to Keene


Noonmark and The Range from Round Mtn


Noonmark makes a statement for wilderness


Raven on Round Mtn


Rock weathering on Round Mtn


Nathan Farb’s lovely, deep, cosmic meditation and artistic statement on wilderness inspired a climbing of Round Mountain recently. From the Ausable Club parking lot, the trail ascended and the work of the hike up was assuaged by the streams, small pools, and soaking moss and liverworts on the rock slabs. The hat went into those icy pools and back on the head many times. Slowly the forest turned to the large white birches, sign of the great fires of a hundred and more years ago, then suddenly to balsam fir and red spruce, walking on eroded anorthosite, perfect for a grip on the rock. Finally emerging on a blasted, weathered summit, well worn by hikers, not a soul was present except the ethereal Blackpoll warbler, singing thinly from the balsam and spruce, never materializing; then Magnolia warbler, so colorful but only showing itself as a shadow in the thick needles from time to time, then Swainson’s thrush, that beautiful songster – all singing lustily, persistently after their long migration to the mountains. Why wouldn’t these not so delicate songsters come out, come out from the balsam’s thick embrace? A raven barked and perched conveniently for my camera, some satisfaction there. As the breeze died at noon, the blackflies found me. But my attention was concentrated on the vast, solitary mountain scenes all around, the stolid Noonmark thrusting upward, anchored in front against the strongly etched background range of Wolf Jaws, Armstrong and Gothics. Then I discovered the views continued south to distant Colvin and Blake and Pinnacle and I could imagine spreading Elk Lake hidden in that basin far out of sight. Heaven up-histedness was all Old Mountain Phelps could say about all this. That spirit was speaking to mine and to every bird and every rock and cloud. It was speaking through Nathan Farb. May it continue to speak.




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2014

12/22/14 Counting Christmas Birds read more >
12/08/14 Will An ‘ACR Interpretation’ Be APA’s New Default? read more >
11/18/14 State Land Plan: A Conversation with Peter Paine read more >
11/06/14 Finding Hope For Wild Places read more >
10/21/14 Message to APA: Know Your Own Master Plan read more >
10/17/14 Adirondack Wild’s 2014 Annual Meeting and Awards read more >
09/09/14 Diversity is not inclusion read more >
09/03/14 Conserving Land: A Personal Story
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06/26/14 Hike on Round Mountain read more >
05/22/14 50th Anniversary of George Perkins Marsh’s Man and Nature read more >
05/21/14 The 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act read more >
01/20/14 Bernard C. Smith: NYS Senate Conservation Champion read more >
01/07/14 The State’s Environmental Protection Fund read more >
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The mission of Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve is to advance New York’s ‘Forever Wild’ legacy and Forest Preserve policies in the Adirondack and Catskill Parks, and promote public and private land stewardship that is consistent with wild land values through education, advocacy and research.

Top left, Autumn © Ken Rimany; Maple Leaves and Lichen ©Ken Rimany

ADIRONDACK PARK REGIONAL
Peter Brinkley, Honorary Chair
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Terry Jandreau, Chair
terry.jandreau@yahoo.com
 
Christopher Amato
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camato@adirondackwild.org
David H. Gibson, Partner
dgibson@adirondackwild.org
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